Hebrew Language

Welcome to the Modern Hebrew Language Program at Rutgers University. We offer courses in elementary, intermediate, and advanced Modern Hebrew Language. Learning Hebrew opens windows to the study of Jewish history, literature, religion, and culture, Israeli life, archaeology, and linguistics, among other topics. Knowledge of Hebrew can contribute to pursuing a career in politics, journalism, religion, Jewish education, Jewish community service, business, technology, international relations, and international law, as well as other fields.

Hebrew Language Placement

The sequence of courses in Modern Hebrew Language starts at the very beginning—teaching basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills—and continues to an advanced level of proficiency.

Students who have not studied Hebrew previously should register for Elementary Modern Hebrew (563:101), which is offered in the fall semester.

All students who have previously studied Hebrew are required to take a Hebrew language placement exam.  Students then register for language courses according to their placement test results.  Students who have previously studied Hebrew and whose placement test results are at the elementary level should register for Hebrew Review and Continuation (563:121), which is offered in the spring semester.

Students who complete six semesters of Modern Hebrew language at the advanced level can earn a Minor in Modern Hebrew Language.

Resources

Hebrew Language Courses

(NOTE: All Modern Hebrew Language courses are cross-listed with AMESALL.)

Elementary Modern Hebrew  Part 1 (101)

This course develops primary language skills, through extensive practice in reading and writing. Since emphasis is put on the sentence as a unit of language, students are engaged from the very beginning in creative writing and speech. Basic competence in grammar and comprehensive reading is achieved as well. Communication skills are enhanced by engaging in conversations based on everyday situations, and a variety of cultural topics. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required.

Hebrew Review and Continuation (121)

This course is designed for students with previous exposure to Hebrew (e.g. heritage speakers, Jewish day school students, etc.), who are in need of a thorough review in order to enhance their basic language skills.  Upon completion of this course, students will be placed into Intermediate Hebrew (131).  The course emphasizes cognitive academic language proficiency as well as communication skills.  Competence in the four areas of language (comprehensive reading, creative writing, grammar, and speech) is acquired through practice of grammar, reading of various Hebrew texts, class discussions, and composition writing.

Intermediate Modern Hebrew Part 1 (131)

The objectives of this course are twofold: development of language skills and preparing the students to approach Hebrew literature in an analytical and comprehensive manner. Students develop conversational skills by regular participation in class presentations and discussions of current events and cultural issues. Advance grammatical forms are integrated into the reading material, which is selected from various Hebrew, sources such as Biblical, Talmudic, as well as modern Israeli stories.


Intermediate Modern Hebrew, Part 2 (132)

The objectives of this course are twofold: (1) development of language skills, and (2) preparing students to read and analyze Hebrew literature. Students develop conversational skills by regular participation in class presentations and discussions of current and cultural events. Advance grammatical forms are integrated into the discussion of reading material, which is selected from various Hebrew sources.

Advanced Modern Hebrew, Part 1  (210)

This course is designed to develop fluency and increase proficiency in reading and writing skills. The course provides an intensive training in Hebrew Grammar and syntax through the reading and analysis of short essays, and newspaper and magazine articles. Reading and writing assignments as well as creative writing and oral presentations are part of the course work.

Advanced Modern Hebrew, Part 2  (211)

This course is designed to develop fluency and increase proficiency in reading and writing skills. The course provides intensive training in Hebrew grammar and syntax through analysis of short essays and newspaper and magazine articles. Course work includes reading and writing assignments as well as creative writing and oral presentations.

Contemporary Hebrew Literature and Media (371)

This course is a continuation of the study of comprehension, conversation and composition with readings in Hebrew drawn from popular Israeli literature complemented with magazine and press articles. The course focuses on the acquisition of academic language proficiency skills through the analysis of the cultural themes as they are reflected in the writings. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature (372)

The objective of this course is to develop a critical approach to literature through text analysis, class discussions and written compositions. Readings include poetry and short stories. Students also examine the structure of language and explore how language is used to convey literary, cultural, and personal meanings. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.