Hebrew Language

Hebrew Language Placement

Freshman Placement testing: Click here

All students with prior Hebrew experience are required to take a Hebrew language placement exam.  Students then register for language courses according to the placement results.

A special review course, Hebrew Review and Continuation (563:121) was created for students with previous Hebrew background and whose placements results are at the 100 level.

Hebrew Language Courses

Elementary Modern Hebrew  Part 1 (101)

This course develops primary language skills, through extensive practice in reading and writing. Since emphasis is put on the sentence as a unit of language, students are engaged from the very beginning in creative writing and speech. Basic competence in grammar and comprehensive reading is achieved as well. Communication skills are enhanced by engaging in conversations based on everyday situations, and a variety of cultural topics. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required.

Hebrew Review and Continuation (121)

This course is designed for students with previous exposure to Hebrew (e.g. heritage speakers, Jewish day school students, etc.), who are in need of a thorough review in order to enhance their basic language skills.  Upon completion of this course, students will be placed into Intermediate Hebrew (131).  The course emphasizes cognitive academic language proficiency as well as communication skills.  Competence in the four areas of language (comprehensive reading, creative writing, grammar, and speech) is acquired through practice of grammar, reading of various Hebrew texts, class discussions, and composition writing.

Intermediate Modern Hebrew Part 1 (131)

The objectives of this course are twofold: development of language skills and preparing the students to approach Hebrew literature in an analytical and comprehensive manner. Students develop conversational skills by regular participation in class presentations and discussions of current events and cultural issues. Advance grammatical forms are integrated into the reading material, which is selected from various Hebrew, sources such as Biblical, Talmudic, as well as modern Israeli stories.

Intermediate Modern Hebrew  Part 2 (132)

The objectives of this course are twofold: (1) development of language skills, and (2) preparing students to read and analyze Hebrew literature. Students develop conversational skills by regular participation in class presentations and discussions of current and cultural events. Advance grammatical forms are integrated into the discussion of reading material, which is selected from various Hebrew sources.

Advanced Modern Hebrew  (210)

This course is designed to develop fluency and increase proficiency in reading and writing skills. The course provides an intensive training in Hebrew Grammar and syntax through the reading and analysis of short essays, and newspaper and magazine articles. Reading and writing assignments as well as creative writing and oral presentations are part of the course work.

Advanced Modern Hebrew  (211)

This course is designed to develop fluency and increase proficiency in reading and writing skills. The course provides intensive training in Hebrew grammar and syntax through analysis of short essays and newspaper and magazine articles. Course work includes reading and writing assignments as well as creative writing and oral presentations.

Contemporary Hebrew Literature and Media (371)

This course is a continuation of the study of comprehension, conversation and composition with readings in Hebrew drawn from popular Israeli literature complemented with magazine and press articles. The course focuses on the acquisition of academic language proficiency skills through the analysis of the cultural themes as they are reflected in the writings. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature (372)

The objective of this course is to develop a critical approach to literature through text analysis, class discussions and written compositions. Readings include poetry and short stories. Students also examine the structure of languge and explore how language is used to convey literary, cultural,  and personal meanings. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

Readings in Modern Hebrew Literature  (471)

The course examines Israeli life through the lens of Hebrew Literature. Students are introduced to the Hebrew masters through poetry and selection of short stories. The goal of the course is to develop skills in critical reading of literary texts and to improve writing and conversational skills. Films in Hebrew relevant to the texts discussed in class are viewed.  Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

The Hebrew Novel (472)

Israeli society, national Israeli identity, the Zionist dream, the culture of the army, love and relationships are some of the themes that will be explored in the course. Focusing on the Israeli novel, and in relevant cases - its adaptation to the screen, students will acquire understanding Part 2f the complexity of life in Israel and the significance of literature in the representation of this contexture. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

Love and Desire in Hebrew Prose and Poetry  (484)

This advanced course explores the theme of love in Hebrew prose, poetry and film. Selected texts from the Biblical period to the 20th century are read, paying particular attention to their articulation of relationships, passion, and desire. Films in Hebrew relevant to the texts discussed in class are viewed throughout the semester. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

Hebrew Literature & Israeli Society  (485)

This course traces the development of modern Israeli literature beginning with the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, up until the present day. Reading and analyzing a variety of short stories through the semester will enrich the students Hebrew and allow them to enhance their understanding of the language. Through these stories, written by influential Israeli authors, we will define the Israeli hero and discuss the question of the Israeli identity. Note: This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.

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  Dept of Jewish Studies
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  New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  848-932-2033